A SPORTS PODIATRISTS GUIDE TO PLANTAR FASCIITIS & HEEL PAIN

If you asked members of your F45, run club, work team and family, you’d be surprised how many people suffer (or have previously suffered) with plantar fasciitis. Often beginning as an annoyance in the morning, this pain can quickly transcend into a debilitating sharp pain, preventing normal weight bearing until the foot ‘warms up’. If this sounds awfully familiar, chances are you too could be suffering with Plantar fasciitis (pronounced plantar fas-ci-i-tis). With hallmark symptoms of pain first thing in the morning, after rest, and with prolonged periods of standing and exercise, plantar fasciitis can be located in the heel, the arch of the foot, and rarely at the attachment into the ball of the foot.

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A HIGH ARCH - NOT NECESSARILY THE PERFECT ARCH

A high arched foot can be identified by the high bridge (arch) of the foot when weight bearing and the heels turn inwards when observed from behind. Due to the lack of pronation (rolling in), a high arched foot suffers poor shock absorption and a high degree of bone stress. We have been taught to think that a high arch is a healthy arch, and a low arch is an unhealthy arch, therefore a supinated foot often gets overlooked for management.  Common injuries associated with a high arched foot include sesamoiditis, plantar fasciitis, persistent back pain, fat pad inflammation, heel spurs, stress fractures and lateral ankle pain.

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Sports Podiatrists
5 SIGNS YOU MIGHT NEED TO SEE A PODIATRIST

A sports podiatry consultation typically involves a comprehensive assessment of the site of pain, a walking (and running) biomechanical assessment, plus a short and long-term management plan.

The podiatrist's primary role is to identify if there is an underlying mechanical issue contributing to the injury or pain. If so, then a management plan to correct or reduce the underlying structural driver may be required. Footwear recommendation, strengthening and stretching exercises and gait advice may also be applicable.

If there is no direct clinical correlation between your pain and biomechanics, then further investigation and referral to a specialist may be required.

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Sports Podiatrists
THE PODIATRISTS SECRETS TO HIGH HEEL COMFORT

The higher and narrower the heel, the greater activation is required by key muscles to stabilise the foot and ankle. When the primary stabilisation muscles fatigue, the secondary muscles overcompensate. When fatigued, muscles lose the ability to produce appropriate stability, putting the wearer at risk of injury, and/or causing the wearer to hail a cab.’

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